Asset prices in The Monday Briefing

Consumer debt, how worried should we be?

Credit

It would be hard to imagine life without mortgage and consumer credit.

Mortgages have extended home-ownership beyond the ranks of those on high incomes or with large amounts of capital. Credit has helped bring other major purchases, such as a new car or a kitchen, within the reach of most households. For the wider economy there are benefits too, since access to credit helps keep households going when incomes are under pressure.

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Posted on 10/09/2018

What happened over the summer?

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The summer months tend to be pretty thin for media coverage of economics and finance. Like the rest of us, journalists take their holidays in July and August. Yet economics is no respecter of holidays and events and data have continued to pile up.

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Posted on 03/09/2018

Turkish lessons

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Emerging market economies have been the main losers from US protectionism and higher US interest rates.

 

Capital has flooded out of emerging economies to the US to benefit from rising interest rates. This has meant less liquidity and has sent some emerging economy currencies through the floor. Emerging market governments or businesses which borrowed in dollars, and many have, are having to cope with rising financing costs and a heavier local currency debt burden.

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Posted on 28/08/2018

In search of affordable housing

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The price of housing in emerging economies and the West has surged since the financial crisis. According to the Organisation of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), house prices in the richer, industrialised nations that make up OECD member states, have risen 26% since the trough in 2009. Emerging market economies have seen far greater increases.

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Posted on 30/07/2018

Equities: From exuberance to caution

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The behaviour of the equity market provides useful signals about where investors think the global economy is heading. As we move into the second half of 2018 here’s our mid-year assessment of what equity markets are telling us.

 

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Posted on 16/07/2018

Emerging markets and the end of cheap money

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There’s never a shortage of things that could go wrong with the global economy. One that’s joined the list in recent months is worries about the health of some emerging market (EM) economies. In a sign of unease nervous investors have been pulling money out of EM equity and bond funds. What’s happening and why does this matter for the rest of the world?

 

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Posted on 25/06/2018

Rising wealth, sluggish wages

The City_London
In the last decade Britain and the US have experienced an unusual combination of soaring asset prices and sluggish wage growth.

Between 2006 and 2016, the total value of assets held by UK households rose by 59% while average incomes increased by just 24%.

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Posted on 21/05/2018

What’s up with the oil price?

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The oil price has had a turbocharged run in the last year, rising almost 60%. Last Friday it closed at a three year high of $77 a barrel. From the, early 2016, lows of under $30 the oil price has risen by over 160%.

Three factors explain the rebound in oil prices.

First, the global economic upswing has come faster than expected fuelling demand for oil and bolstering prices. Despite a first quarter wobble, the global economy is likely to grow at the fastest rate in seven years in 2018.

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Posted on 14/05/2018

Thoughts on the global economy

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Last month Deloitte’s economists from across the world met in London to assess the outlook for the global economy. It was a fascinating and wide-ranging discussion. Rather than trying to summarise individual views, here are some of the areas where the discussions affected my own thinking.

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Posted on 01/05/2018

Technology and productivity - a complicated relationship

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There are numerous explanations for why technology is no longer boosting productivity in the way it did in the twentieth century. The US economist, Robert Gordon, argues that today’s technologies are less productivity-enhancing than the great inventions of the past. The opposing view is that technology is still working its magic, but in ways, such as improving the quality of goods and services, which are poorly captured by the statistics.

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Posted on 16/04/2018