Technology in Deloitte careers blog

Key tips for getting a job in programming

We've asked our Deloitte Digital colleagues to give us a quick tip sheet for those looking at a career in programming.

Eóin and Jacob are our resident iOS developers who specialises in user-experience-focused apps. From flying drones in North Wales, to attending LGBTQ late opening and working recruit new graduates to join Deloitte Digital so there's never a dull day!

Get ready, here's their insights and tips to starting a career in programming:

  1. Interest in Coding - As an engineering applicant you need to be able to code some. But if you didn’t do it at university, proving you’re interested by teaching yourself is a great way to get an edge. Use Udacity, Big Nerd Ranch or Ray Wenderlich for beginner-level tutorials. Showcase your projects and get inspiration from others with GitHub.
  2. Commercial Awareness - Be sure to keep up-to-date on recent business news and understand current world events. Read the Financial Times or the Economist critically to develop this.
  3. Work Experience - For many places, this is a must as it proves you can operate in a workplace environment.
  4. Extra Curricular Activities - Have you been in a band? Have you helped run a society at university? Played in a sports team? All of these show dedication and develop key soft skills.
  5. Previous Entrepreneurial Endeavours - Selling t-shirts on your website or making profit on an event you set up all count!
  6. Being Friendly & Approachable - The seemingly banal trait of being a nice person actually goes a long long way in landing a job at Deloitte.

Do you have questions for Eóin and Jacob? Leave your question below and they'll get back to you!

Continue reading

Posted on 19/06/2017 | 1 Comments

Test your problem solving skills: Forensic Technology Challenge #4

6a01543429fb37970c01b8d21c4a22970c-800wi

Paying homage to our fondness of brain-teasers, every month we post a new challenge created by the Forensic Technology team, focusing on logical, analytical and coding problems.


Analysing data for patterns/trends is an important part of what we do in Forensic Technology. With this in mind we have returned to our programming roots for this month’s challenge. Can you write a script to solve the below…?


i) What are the factors of 379065191139531?

ii) What connects 35432488 with these numbers: 806095675586097, 7405814774826 and 379065191139531

We’ll be posting our Python based solution next month at which point we will bid you farewell for the year. We hope to be back next year with more puzzles but in a different format so make sure you keep an eye out for our return!

Enjoyed this? Check out our other Forensic Technology blog posts


If you are someone who enjoys problem-solving, logical thinking and technology, check out our Forensic Technology graduate professional roles to see if they are the right fit.

 

What's the answer?

For the final time this year we present our solution to the challenge we have set you:

i) Below is the code we used in Python 3.5 to calculate the factors of 379065191139531:

Image001

ii) As alluded to in part i) the first step to solving ii) is to get the factors of 806095675586097, 7405814774826 and 379065191139531. The next part is not so obvious. First we need the common factors of the 3 numbers we were just looking at. Then with some outside-the-box thinking we sum over these common factors to arrive at 35432488.

The code to do this is below:

Image002

We hope to be back next year bigger and better so keep a look out for future posts.

Continue reading

Posted on 27/10/2016 | 0 Comments

Test your problem solving skills: Forensic Technology Challenge #3

6a01543429fb37970c01b8d202e6f5970c-800wi

Paying homage to our fondness of brain-teasers, every month we post a new challenge created by the Forensic Technology team, focusing on logical, analytical and coding problems.


For this month’s challenge, we are heading over to Rio (figuratively) and getting into the spirit of the Paralympic games. Using the publicly available data for the last two Paralympics (Beijing and London), we want you to predict using a mathematical model how many gold medals ParalympicsGB will win in Rio.

Continue reading

Posted on 14/09/2016 | 0 Comments

Test your problem solving skills: Forensic Technology Challenge #2

6a01543429fb37970c01b8d202e6f5970c-800wi

Paying homage to our fondness of brain-teasers, every month we post a new challenge created by the Forensic Technology team, focusing on logical, analytical and coding problems.


For this month’s challenge you need to put your spy hat on and decrypt a message.

Continue reading

Posted on 09/08/2016 | 4 Comments

Forensic Technology Challenge – Bonus Question

6a01543429fb37970c01b8d202e6f5970c-800wi

Already solved the #4TechChallenge for this month? Here’s a bonus question to keep your mind in challenge mode:

Continue reading

Posted on 15/07/2016 | 2 Comments

Test your problem solving skills: Forensic Technology Challenge #1

Forensic Technology FB

In Forensic Technology complex problem solving is a large part of our day-to-day work.

Paying homage to our fondness of brain-teasers, we’re launching a monthly Forensic Technology Challenge - a new series of logical, analytical and coding problems that put into practice the STEM, finance and technology skills essential to our work.

Continue reading

Posted on 08/07/2016 | 8 Comments

Forensic Technology at IT’s Not Just For the Boys event

Zoyah Ahmed from Forensic Technology who attended Target Jobs IT’s Not Just For the Boys event shares her recollection of the event below.

“Last month I represented Deloitte’s Forensic Technology team at Target Jobs IT’s Not Just For the Boys Event. The purpose of this event was to give female undergraduate students the opportunity to find out more about careers available to them within the technology industry.ITevent1

I took part in the ‘Insider Insights’ and ‘Networking’ sessions, in which I spoke to numerous students about my day to day role within Forensic Technology and also gave them some advice on what technology recruiters are looking for. I enjoyed these sessions as it wasn’t too long ago that I was in the same position myself, and I hope that my recent experiences and advice will help those who I spoke to.  

I also had the opportunity to attend the ‘Panel Discussion’ session in which the students had the chance to ask senior female leaders within technology questions about their careers and how they achieved their success. The leaders also gave advice on how to be successful women in technology and reach leadership positions within this field.

I attended this event to give advice to young women on how to enter the technology sector but I also learnt a lot through this event. One of the key points I took away was that as women, we tend to keep quiet about our successes, but if we have done something which deserves recognition, we should show it off it. This means when it comes to promotions, our successes are already well-known.ITevent2

The fact that I learnt so much shows the importance of attending these events: I found this event invaluable, and I am already a woman in technology. Had I attended something similar when I was a graduate it would have given me a much better understanding of the technology industry. This in turn would have helped me improve my graduate job applications. I would highly recommend all women interested in this sector to attend events like these because they give attendees a good opportunity to learn more about technology careers and how to succeed within them. 

Register now for our Forensic Technology Insight Day on 22nd March.  Further details can be found at: http://www2.deloitte.com/uk/en/pages/careers/articles/deloitte-insight-days.html"

Continue reading

Posted on 16/03/2016 | 1 Comments

Forensic Technology office in St Albans

Lab

The Forensic Technology practice has grown dramatically over the last 10 years and today is a team of 84 professionals. We are embarking on a new and exciting expansion by opening an office in St Albans and we are looking for ambitious and driven individuals to help grow the team to 50 in this location. We have invested in a spacious state of the art laboratory for analysing and processing data. From a work perspective there will be no distinction between the office in London with a variety of opportunities within the UK and abroad.

The picture below is from our office window and shows just how close the train station is. There is also free parking on site so several of our London based team members are considering swapping their rail season ticket for a set of car keys!

FT-StAlbans

Callum from the Deloitte St Albans office describes what it was like working outside of the City.

“There is a more relaxed, friendly and personal working environment. The St Albans social committee plan all sorts of fun events, the Summer and Christmas Balls are the main ones. Then there’s the new joiner social event in the local pubs and there is an end of busy season social at the end of February which is usually a bar night in London, curry night, karaoke. Then they always try and switch things up last year they did cheese and wine night and a trip to London Zoo, this year there is talks of arranging everyone to go to a football match.”

Find more information about who we are, what we do and our Graduate Recruitment opportunities on the Forensic Technology website.

Continue reading

Posted on 22/02/2016 | 0 Comments

Forensic Technology Graduate Training

TeamOur own Nehal, from Forensic Technology blogs her experiences so far at Deloitte.

“I am currently a part of the Forensic Technology graduate training scheme, which I started in 2014, after completing a Bachelor’s degree in Physics at Imperial College London.”

“The scheme comprises of one year in Forensic Analytics and one year in Electronic Discovery, which I am under taking at present. I am going to focus on one part of the E-discovery discipline: data collection. Last month I travelled to Copenhagen with the team below to participate in my first ever data collection. I learned how to dismantle laptops to remove the hard drives and set up the equipment needed in order to image them.”

Even though this picture looks a little intimidating, the process is quite simple once you understand the purpose of each component.

As this was my first ever onsite data collection I was a bit nervous but the rest of the team were very supportive. EquipmentThey helped me develop the skills needed so that, by the end of the day, I was able to proceed with little help. It was fantastic that I was given the opportunity to go to Copenhagen and I find that even though I had completed training in this area, you often learn more on the job.

We are also lucky in that a lot of our projects in Forensics are based abroad, which means we are provided with ample opportunity to meet and work with our colleagues from the Deloitte offices in other countries and explore new and exciting places. (Check out Copenhagen below).

So, if you feel like learning more about this electrifying line of work, then please don’t hesitate to reach out to me and leave a comment below. I will be only too happy to help!

Copenhagen

Continue reading

Posted on 11/02/2016 | 7 Comments

Returning and flexible working with Deloitte

Victoria Pearce, Director at Deloitte in the Forensic Technology team shares her experience on returning to work with Deloitte.

Victoria said "I joined Deloitte Forensic in 2000 and in 2011 I started my maternity leave and subsequently took a 3 year career break following the birth of my daughter."

"Earlier this year I was contacted by Deloitte via the Women in Leadership initiative and asked if I was interested in returning to work at Deloitte. Following a number of discussions and interviews it became apparent the opportunity was too good to miss. Deloitte have implemented an agile working policy which enabled me to return to Deloitte Forensic Technology as a part time worker in their growing St Albans team. Flexible working allows me to work remotely to ease child care issues and to spend quality time with my daughter, here we are standing in muddy puddles – just before jumping!"

  Image003

Continue reading

Posted on 22/01/2016 | 3 Comments